Bruce and the Art of Rock ’n’ Roll Storytelling

Above all, Bruce’s music reminds us what great rock ’n’ roll is and has always been about: the human condition. It’s an art of American storytelling, and nobody has done it better or longer than Bruce. The Broadway album slips seamlessly between song and speech, poetry and prose, narration and prayer. It’s passionate, vulgar, reverent, tearful, kind, angry, humble, proud, and funny. It is profoundly human, a feature that distinguishes great music from the profanely human music of lesser artists.

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Four Reasons Republicans Should Fear Beto O’Rourke

Nobody knows what will happen in 2020. Soon enough the drama will be playing out before us. If Republicans plan to win, we need to be scouting the field and prepare ourselves for what’s coming. It is easy to scoff at the extremists on the other side, but if we’re not careful, they just might win. Beto has the fundraising power, grassroots enthusiasm, inspiring rhetoric, and crossover appeal to beat Trump in 2020.

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Forgive, But Don’t Forget

Szekely admitting to his gross behavior and withdrawing for self-reflection is a far bigger gesture of repentance than many of his celebrity colleagues have made. It raises the question: if a public figure genuinely demonstrates regret for causing others pain (rather than merely being sorry for having been caught), should we as a society show some sort of mercy and accept their apology?

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Does Liberalism Strangle the Virtue it Requires?

Yet democratic liberalism, for all its prosperous fruits, is beginning to show underlying pathologies that cannot be fixed using its own premises. To suggest we return to the earlier liberalism of the Founders, wherein the cultivation of virtue was left to private institutions widely considered necessary, suggests the presence of a self-correcting mechanism in liberalism that has not been found, or at least has not developed a lasting consensus.

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Two Cheers for Trumpism

Perhaps, as French implies, the best approach to combatting the Left’s attempt to remake middle America is to assert personal responsibility instead of stir up anger against the Left since that anger risks making people feel helpless and unable to live a better life.  One can “say no” to drugs—and live a better life.  No laws prohibit people from marrying and staying together.  Certainly responsibility is part of any solution and one cannot hope for too much from politics, as French suggests (would Tucker disagree?—I don’t think so). 

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Life Without Love Is Blind: The Philosophy of Bird Box

The recent Netflix phenomenon, Bird Box, presents two radically different understandings of life. Malorie, the main character, values survival above all else. This seems like a prudent philosophy to adopt in an apocalyptic world, but Malorie takes it to an inhuman extreme. Malorie's philosophical counterweight is represented by the character Tom. The movie subtly reveals the differences between the two characters as the plot unfolds and Malorie slowly realizes that she must embrace Tom’s philosophy of life as more than survival in order to live life well.

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Private Virtue, Our Only Hope

Although our country was founded upon this energetic contest, our Founders also stressed the importance of personal and civic virtue. Benjamin Franklin argued that “Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.” Franklin argued that political corruption follows a lack of virtue, not of ambition.

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Modern Vulgarity and Our Libertarian Future

Tocqueville tells us that democratic art will not be concerned with heroes or gods. Rather man’s passions, doubts, and “incomprehensible miseries” will inspire modern poetry and art.  Through the miseries associated with lives dedicated to vulgarity and obscenity, much modern art indirectly teaches moral lessons that the old censors could appreciate. 

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Scott YenorComment
Why Humans Love Fire

Our redemption of fire imitates God’s redemptive work. Although all Creation is inherently good, some parts have been so twisted by the Enemy’s malice and our sin that they seem to lose much of this goodness. By using this element of Creation to bring about good things in spite of its fallen nature, we imitate our Father, who is always working to bring good out of evil. Something as simple as a campfire can and should remind us of our role in redeeming our fallen world.

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The New Kings of Rock?

Rock ’n’ roll has always been about standing up for ideas that challenge norms, inherently making it a counter-cultural and rebellious genre. Hippie moralism, however, is no longer counter-cultural, and it hardly fulfills the rock potential previously glimpsed in Greta van Fleet.

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Shame on You, Julie Kelly

The French family has been treated horribly by the far-right due to their public stances against Trump. There are plenty of solid arguments to be made against the Never Trump movement and Nancy French’s skepticism regarding Brett Kavanaugh, but the character assassination offered by Julie Kelly amounts to nothing more than a politically motivated hit.

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Sanctimonious and Cool: Why Our Rulers Hate Politics

To one degree or another, democratic elites aspire to overcome both “national accidents” and “accidents by birth,” achieving an unlimited recognition between peoples. Blocking this are the forces that make humans and nations distinct. Between nation-states, it is differing customs, religious beliefs, or societal hierarchies. For individuals, it is dynamics like marriage, sexuality, the family, and age.

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Jackson YenorComment
Incarnate in Us: A Christmas Reflection

The joyful mystery of the Incarnation is a lot to unpack. By it, man’s relationship with God was permanently changed. Formerly, in the Old Testament, God’s Chosen People had been marked by obedience to rituals and legal code. The appearance of the Messiah, however, marked the beginning of a New Testament—a fulfillment of God’s ancient promise and the institution of a new faith.

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The Gospel of Envy

If the 2016 Democratic primary is any indication, 13 million Americans today are ready to embrace the socialist label. What explains this fascination with a toxic ideology that’s responsible for tens of millions of deaths? American socialists appear not to care about the rising standard of living; rather, they seem to be motivated more by envy of the wealth and success of others.

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