Posts in Culture
All Roads Lead to Rome

The divine mysteries as taught in Catholicism are what we ought to pursue. In a culture that consistently advocates self-interest and instant gratification, we need the Truth inherent in Catholicism to elevate us and draw us in to a two-thousand-year history that can be traced back to Jesus and the Twelve Apostles.

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Separating the music from the noise: A preview of the ACM awards

This weekend, the Academy of Country Music will hand out a variety of awards. The single of the year category, however, is particularly interesting because it showcases examples of country music both at its best and at its worst. The five nominated songs showcase the profound depths that country music is able to reach while also showing the silliness that the genre can produce. In light of this, it is worth thinking about the individual merits of each nominated song.

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The First Supper

Partaking in the liturgical celebration of the Eucharist, we unite ourselves to Christ’s death and resurrection in the literal blood and body of Christ. Every time the Mass is performed, those that partake are being brought back to the cross where God has given his life—a renewal of our covenant with him.

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Why NBA Teams Should Tank

    As the NBA season draws to a close most fans will be following the teams at the top of the standings as they fight for playoff position. However, there is also an equally competitive fight occurring at the bottom of the standings as eight teams battle for the worst record in the league to improve their odds of landing a high draft pick. Intentionally losing, otherwise known as tanking, is controversial throughout the league as Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was recently fined for admitting that this was his team’s strategy.

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How Local Papers Sustain Democracy

For decentralization to be successful on a large scale we must develop a more active local political community. Newspaper subscriptions might seem like a strange way to accomplish this, especially given the recent decline in newspaper circulation, however, it is a small step that could have a great impact in strengthening local political communities all across the country.

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The Sound of Love: An Exploration of Slow Music

As I began to craft a list similar to the “10 Underrated Pieces of Classical Music for Christmas” for Valentine’s Day, having the subject be pieces about love instead, I began to realize a pattern: all the music I selected was slow. One after another, Brahms’ Op. 118, Tchaikovsky’s 5th Symphony, any middle movement from Mozart or Mahler, all of this music was slow. This led me to wonder why the music of love has always been slow.

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The Importance of Buying Local

Once citizens are habituated to thinking of themselves as members of a local community they will be more likely to take an interest in the affairs of that community and become involved in local free associations. Therefore, whenever possible citizens should spend money at local businesses, rather than national chains.

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CultureJosh FreyComment
“We may go out with a whimper instead of a bang”— A Conversation With Dr. Scott Yenor

Late last month Nicholas Bartulovic and Josh Frey of The New Lyceum editorial staff sat down to have a conversation with Dr. Scott Yenor, professor of political science at Boise State University, to talk about the state of conservatism on college campuses (particularly in regards to the controversy which happened to him last semester), his involvement in classical education, and his recent scholarship and publication on David Hume.

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Heroes in a Sea of Victims

When the Academy counts its votes for Best Picture, the choice should be clear: Dunkirk. Last week it was nominated, but it probably won’t win. This is a kind of movie which defies the normal war film genre because it uniquely places the viewer in the action. It is not the type of movie the esteemed members of the Academy are likely to reward. 

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