Posts in Book Review
Debunking the Science v Religion Myth

In many circles of the modern science community, theistic religion is portrayed as an anti-factual boogeyman intent on destroying human progress. Science itself becomes a religion with its own laws, clergymen, martyrs, infallible doctrine, and oral history. Any “human advancement” met with theistic skepticism or moral opposition becomes a crusade against scientific infidels whose concepts of supernatural law must be stamped out. This includes, of course, a revisionist account of the past to inspire the “heroic” progressives of today.

Read More
A Forgotten Tale: Christian Lessons in C.S. Lewis' The Silver Chair

The principle Narnian character, Puddleglum, is neither a lost prince nor a valiant, sword wielding mouse; instead he appears to be an average citizen of Narnia chosen for the quest simply due to his knowledge of the territory. As the story progresses, however, Puddleglum proves to be one of the best examples of faith in the whole series and a model for Christians to follow.

Read More
Birth of an Empire: A Review of The Landmark Julius Caesar

Over the years, the Landmark series has quickly grown into an authoritative position among students and teachers, for reasons obvious to anyone familiar with Strassler’s work. The latest addition to this series, The Landmark Julius Caesar: The Complete Works continues that tradition. For the first time, Strassler’s series steps out of its comfort zone of Greek writers, entering the ferocious Imperii Romani. This new work is comprehensive, including all the trademarks of the series that readers have come to know and love.

Read More
The Undoing Response: A Reaction to The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis

For much of human history, the mind-body problem presented a scientific dilemma because the workings of the mind are unobservable. Economic theory and the Enlightenment painted humans as rational beings, making mental processes and emotions irrelevant. Driven by economic theory, the idea of humans as primarily rational actors carried into the Twentieth Century. 

Read More